African Charter on the Rights and Welfare of the Child

The African Charter on the Rights and Welfare of the Child (also called the ACRWC or Children’s Charter) was adopted by the Organisation of African Unity (OAU) in 1990 (in 2001, the OAU legally became the African Union) and was entered into force in 1999. Like the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC), the Children’s Charter is a comprehensive instrument that sets out rights and defines universal principles and norms for the status of children. The ACRWC and the CRC are the only international and regional human rights treaties that cover the whole spectrum of civil, political, economic, social and cultural rights.
It calls for the creation of an African Committee of Experts on the Rights and Welfare of the Child (Committee of Experts). Its mission is to promote and protect the rights established by the ACRWC, to practice applying these rights, and to interpret the disposition of the ACRWC as required of party states, African Union (AU) institutions, or all other institutions recognized by AU or by a member state.

Contents

1 Focus on Children’s Right in Africa
2 Children’s Charter VS. Convention on the Rights of the Child
3 Ratification of the Children’s Charter
4 Shortcoming and Criticism
5 African Committee of Experts on the Rights and Welfare of the Child (Committee of Experts)
6 Members of the African Committee of Experts on the Rights and Welfare of the Child
7 Challenges Faced by the Committee of Experts
8 State Party Reporting
9 Observer Status for Civil Society Organisations (CSOs)
10 Communications to the Committee of Experts
11 Specific Requirements of a Communication
12 Investigations
13 See also
14 Notes
15 External links

Focus on Children’s Right in Africa[edit]
Children in Africa are affected by many different types of abuse, including economic and sexual exploitation, gender discrimination in education and access to health, and their involvement in armed conflict. Other factors affecting African children include migration, early marriage, differences between urban and rural areas, child-headed households, street children and poverty. Furthermore, child workers in Sub-Saharan Africa account for about 80 million children or 4 out of every 10 children under 14 years old which is the highest child labour rate in the world.
The ACRWC defines a “child” as a human being below the age of 18 years. It recognises the child’s unique and privileged place in African society and that African children need protection and special